UPDATED: Who is Actually Social Distancing (and Who’s Not)

Trendency provides a much more detailed racial breakdown on who's following public health mandates

a Trendency-COVID19 Data Project feature

Special #coronavirus coverage and analysis on #RealityCheck w/ @ellisonreport LIVE streams everywhere at wurdradio.com or WURDapp Mon-Fri at 10am - 1pm ET

Coronavirus & Wisconsin Election: Voters Left with Difficult ...

It’s likely to be one of the defining catch phrases of 2020 – and when you ask people “are you social distancing?” most Americans claim their household is social distancing. There was, however, somewhat surprising responses around gender and race that we did not anticipate. Less surprising, younger Americans ( those under 45) are the least likely to be practicing social distancing (82 percent). UPDATE: We were able to also see this data in a much more granular fashion by breaking down the racial demographic information further.

Slide1.PNG

Since the middle of March we have seen a dramatic drop in the number of Americans who are staying away from public venues and the percent who are avoiding physical contact with someone outside of their home. This is all good news, according to the health experts. However there are still 13 percent, as a whole, who are visiting public venues (not counting essential places) and almost a third who are admitting to contract with people outside of their household.  

Slide2.PNG

Almost a third (31 percent) of Americans that said they were practicing social distancing have had physical contact with someone outside their household.

Deeper Look: We asked two follow-up questions to find out if the terms seemed consistent:

  • Have you visited a public venue in the last 3 days?

  • Have you had physical contact with someone outside your household?

When we correspond Americans who said yes with either of our two statements with self-reported social distancing, we found that Americans are much more closely aligned with staying at home as part of social distancing practices, much more so than physical contact with individuals outside their house. 

slide 3.png

Men, Younger Americans, and Americans of Color - Black and Hispanic, more specifically - are more likely to report venturing out into public, while Whites, older Americans (65+) and women are the least likely to say they go out in public.

Not surprisingly, rural Americans are much less likely to say they have gone to a public venue than those in urban areas.

Slide4.PNG

While we saw some significant differences between cohorts when it comes to visiting public venues, there are minimal differences, when it comes to having physical contact with someone outside your household. The one exception are living areas where those in urban areas are more likely to report contact with non-household members than those in rural areas.

Slide5.PNG

When we look at the cross-section of our three (3) questions, we see that 54 percent of the Americans that say they are social distancing, are staying out of public venues and have not had physical contact with someone outside their household.

Meanwhile, 25 percent are saying they are social distancing but have engaged in one of the two options. What we have left is approximately 14 percent that is not social distancing and another 6 percent that doesn’t know.

Slide6.PNG

If we combine the responses to all of these questions, we find that currently, just 54 percent of Americans are reporting true social distancing behavior. An additional 31 percent say they are, but don’t seem to follow the guidelines of what social distancing would dictate and 8 percent are actively not social distancing.

Slide7.PNG

When we look at a similar breakdown of our three questions by demographics, we find a familiar pattern, but a much better understanding of how groups are social distancing.

Unfortunately, there is not a single demographic cohort where more than two-thirds of members are practicing true social distancing.

Slide8.PNG

Who is Actually Social Distancing (and Who’s Not)

Somewhat surprising responses around gender and race that were not anticipated.

a Trendency-COVID19 Data Project feature

Special #coronavirus coverage and analysis on #RealityCheck w/ @ellisonreport LIVE streams everywhere at wurdradio.com or WURDapp Mon-Fri at 10am - 1pm ET

Election day live blog: Oak Creek sees lines as voters observe ...

It’s likely to be one of the catch phrases defining 2020 – and when you ask people “are you social distancing?” most Americans claim their household is social distancing.

There was, however, somewhat surprising responses around gender and race that we did not anticipate. Less surprising, younger Americans ( those under 45) are the least likely to be practicing social distancing (82%).

slide1.png

Since the middle of March we have seen a dramatic drop in the number of Americans who are staying away from public venues and the percent who are avoiding physical contact with someone outside of their home. This is all good news, according to the health experts. However there are still 13% who are visiting public venues (not counting essential places) and almost a third who are admitting to contract with people outside of their household.  

Slide2.PNG

Almost a third (31 percent) of Americans that said they were practicing social distancing have had physical contact with someone outside their household.

Deeper Look: We asked two follow-up questions to find out if the terms seemed consistent:

  • Have you visited a public venue in the last 3 days?

  • Have you had physical contact with someone outside your household?

When we cross Americans that said “yes” to either of our two statements with self-reported practicing social distancing, we found that Americans are much more closely aligned with staying at home as part of social distancing practices, much more so than physical contact with individuals outside their house. 

slide 3.png

Men, Younger Americans, and Americans of Color are more likely to report venturing out into public, while older Americans (65+), and women are the least likely to say they go out in public.

Not surprisingly, rural Americans are much less likely to say they have gone to a public venue than those in urban areas.

Slide4.PNG

While we saw some significant differences between cohorts when it comes to visiting public venues, there are minimal differences when it comes to having physical contact with someone outside your household. The one exception is living area where those in urban areas are more likely to report contact with non-household members than those in rural areas.

Slide5.PNG

When we look at the cross-section of our three (3) questions, we see that 54 percent of the Americans that say they are social distancing, are staying out of public venues an have not had physical contact with someone outside their household.

Meanwhile, 25 percent are saying they are social distancing, but have engaged in one of the two options. What we have left is approximately 14 percent that is not social distancing and another 6 percent that doesn’t know.

Slide6.PNG

If we combine the responses to all of these questions, we find that currently, just 54 percent of Americans are reporting true social distancing behavior. An additional 31 percent say they are, but don’t seem to be following the guidelines of what social distancing would dictate and 8 percent are actively not social distancing.

Slide7.PNG

When we look at a similar breakdown of our three questions by demographics, we find a familiar pattern, but a much better understanding of how groups are social distancing.

Unfortunately, there is not a single demographic cohort where more than two-thirds of members are practicing true social distancing.

Slide8.PNG

powered by …

The COVID19 Data Project

In the Coronavirus era, the Information Engineers Will Win

Each household’s value going further into the 21st century will be judged on the quality, uniqueness, and value of the information that it sits on

Alton Drew | @altondrew | Guest Contributor

Special #coronavirus coverage and analysis on #RealityCheck w/ @ellisonreport LIVE streams everywhere at wurdradio.com or WURDapp Mon-Fri at 10am - 1pm ET

Learn How to Become a Security Engineer | Protect the Data

Most of us believe life is about accumulating cash, making enough coin to pay the bills, put the kids through school, take a vacation, and buy ourselves a couple toys.  You know.  Living our best life.  Seven hundred thousand Americans found out last month that a virus could cause havoc not only to one’s physical health but also to one’s financial health. There will be less coin available to pay for that best life.

Americans are not coming to terms with the reality of nature; that nature is the ultimate arbiter of life on this planet. It is why the call from political leaders in the United States and worldwide to wage war against a disease seems silly to me. Nature always wins and I believe its victory will be manifested in how it helps change the nature of commerce and work.

How work changes will go beyond whether a unch of lawyers, accountants, and call center operators can conduct business from home with their kids running around. (Fortunately, social distancing at home is easy for me. I have a teenager. They like staying away from their parents.)  Not only will we have to become IT managers overnight, we will have to adjust to two additional tasks: one, becoming database managers; and two, teaching our bosses’ algorithms how to read and navigate the databases we have been assigned to classify and build.

More and more professionals, from lawyers to accountants to doctors are becoming database managers.  They are being asked to go through thousands of documents, classify them, and tag them according to how relevant they are to resolving an issue of law, finance, or medical treatment.

By tagging the contents of these databases, these professionals are providing their bosses’ algorithms a template to follow; a path to build and travel on when they eventually take over more and more responsibility for mining these databases and their content.

Capital, always in fear of a vacuum, is always in search for yield.  It always in search of the information that increases returns on the coin.  The more efficient the search and the more robust and plentiful the information, the greater the yield.  For coin is the physical valuation of information.  The more information capital has for use, the greater the value of the coin.

But for the rest of us, for the non-capital or what I call the credit class, we will have to rethink our view of information. Information is no longer just something told or facts learned.  It is not just news or knowledge.  It is an asset, something owned that has value.  Each household’s value going further into the 21st century will be judged on the quality, uniqueness, and value of the information that it sits on. Households will have to spend more of their most valued currency, time, at least in the short to immediate run, accumulating that most important asset, information.

The virus has dis-aggregated Americans. Americans sitting at home on their desk tops remotely connected to the central brain at their office will soon be called on to generate more energy in the form of information, relying on their own leased data resources and the databases they create. Capital, demanding the reductions in the costs for information searches, will reward those households that can mine, package, and deliver information that provides capital with a list of opportunities for highest yield.

The information engineers will win for they will lead in buying that best life.

powered by …

Learn4Life Rings the Bell for its 20,000th Graduate

School Closures & The Equity Gap - a #CSGCOVID19 Micro-Summit

Could school districts have done any better with their COVID-19 response? And, once we're out of the woods, what does the K-12 future look like for the nation's most marginalized students?

a CSG East feature

The Council of State Governments Eastern Regional Conference, Council on Communities of Color, rolled out its first #CGSCOVID19 micro-summit via Zoom meeting last week entitled “School Closures and the Equity Gap: Impacts on Black and Brown Students.” The #CSGCOVID19 discussions offer insights, analysis and solutions on numerous challenges communities and governments face as the pandemic crisis ensues, particularly how it effects .

These discussions are being done in partnership with the B|E Note.

The first installment was a unique convening of state and local policy makers, experts and thinkers concerned about the massive equity gaps exposed from coronavirus school closures nationwide. As school districts everywhere in all 50 states are forced into historic and unprecedented closings, some of which may last into the end of the school year, K-12 students and parents are faced with great uncertainty. Nowhere is that uncertainty felt greater than in already distressed Black and Brown communities where major social, economic, public health and food disparities exist.

Conversation begins at 01:40 …

“What this crisis has really shown is that our social safety net does net exist,” said Connecticut State Rep. Quentin Phipps (D-Middletown-100th). “It’s hard to talk about what school districts are and aren’t doing unless we address the trauma we’re all going through. If we’re not talking about the question ‘when are we going back?’ If we’re not talking about trauma and that underlying question, I think we’re missing that point. We need to look at the humanistic aspect and how these students and families are experiencing massive amounts of pain.”

“This is beyond the lack of any real structures that could support people in a crisis like this,” notes Khalilah Harris, Managing Director of K-12 Policy for the Center for American Progress. “We are now pushing for an expansion of this concept of what should allow a child to be promoted by covering content, instead of a mastery of skills and mastery of a knowledge base.”

“We have to be aware that children are already coming to school with issues and challenges, so - as educators - we have to look at these students through a trauma lense,” said Michelle Crumpton-Harvey, Vice President of Expansion and Innovation for Learn4Life. “We need to make sure our teachers are taking care of themselves and are prepared to face some of the challenges we’re facing now. Being trauma-informed not only helps with the students, but also the adults. We have an array of issues presented by COVID-19 that we as educators have been dealing with for years and we knew were there.”

powered by …

CSG ERC by The Council of State Governments

From Katrina to Coronavirus, What Have We Learned?

There are striking – and troubling – similarities between the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2005 and the COVID-19 disaster happening now

Leon McDougle, MD, MPH | an ecoWURD Feature

Hurricane Katrina - Facts, Affected Areas & Lives Lost - HISTORY

As I view the reaction to the novel coronavirus unfold in the United States, I’m reminded of lessons learned in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Back then, there was a failure of infrastructure (levees) resulting in more harm to the public than initial damage caused by the landfall of the hurricane.

Let’s fast forward to 2019.

Just as the National Weather Service tracked the impending strike of Hurricane Katrina using satellite imagery, the National Intelligence Agency, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) were tracking the impending strike of novel coronavirus on the United States and the world.

Hurricane Katrina revealed cracks in the levees and the novel coronavirus has uncovered cracks in our public health infrastructure and national emergency management system. Tragically, in both emergencies, inadequate national response, coordinated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), have been hallmarks.

Where is the Director of FEMA? Where is the Director of Homeland Security? What is the federal plan for response to local and state authorities being overwhelmed by novel coronavirus?

Read more here at ecoWURD

powered by …

Logo

Loading more posts…